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Senior Curriculum Snapshot

Kia ora koutou, Talofa Lava and Warm Greetings,

It has been an action-packed year thus far for the college with our senior students achieving highly in several areas. In the senior curriculum space, we are very proud of the commitment our students are demonstrating towards their learning, especially under some challenging times at the start of the academic year. Across our senior programmes there have been some notable changes this year, particularly at Year 11 and 13.

Year 11 (NCEA Level 1)

Towards the middle of last year, a conversation began around how we can create a more meaningful and student-centred programme at NCEA Level 1.

After some creative collaboration from our teachers, a semesterised approach with a focus on contextualised learning to enhance student engagement and agency was introduced. The outcomes and results have been very impressive after a challenging semester one! Our Year 11 teachers would like to acknowledge the following students for their outstanding effort and engagement in semester two courses to date. Well done men, keep up the great work!

Mysteries of the Material World (11MYS)

Joseph Pickover and Felix Bargh

Making Drama (11MDR)

Nico Lavin Hall

Work Ready Literacy (11WRK)

Jesse Floris

Study Skills (11STU)

Lachlan Calder

Apocalypse Now (11APO)

Jonte Hanson

Body as a Machine (11BOD)

Alex Tiffen

Train the Brain (11TTB)

Niko Heather

Get Stuck In (11GSI)

Niko Heather and Thomas Bird

Andrew Auimatagi (Assistant Principal – Engagement & Innovation)


Year 13 Graduate Academy of Sport Programme (G.A.S)

This is the inaugural year of the Graduate Academy of Sport (G.A.S) for senior students at St Thomas of Canterbury College. This course provides our students with the opportunity to further their personal and athletic growth which they apply to their individual sporting codes.

The students spend Mondays, Tuesdays (half days), and Wednesday (full day) as a group, where they engage in multiple sessions such as team and personal performance analysis, multiple strength and conditioning blocks (resistance, recovery, cardio), sporting code specific technical and tactical skill development and module sessions.

The module sessions provide an opportunity to focus on the “whole person”, and the human component to competitive sports and performance. These are critical sessions that promote individual self-awareness through encouraging students to be vulnerable and identifying the internal and external adversities that might manifest themselves in competitive sports. In these sessions we have covered off things such as mental well-being, mental skills to enhance performance, educating around performance enhancing drugs in sport, and recovery.

As we embark on the business end of the winter code season, nutrition becomes incredibly important in maximising recovery and energy output for critical field/court trainings. This week the GAS students have looked into the impact nutrition can have on performance and developing their understanding of what and how much they need to be eating to perform consistently at an optimal level.

It has been impressive to observe how dedicated these students have been towards their personal and sporting development over the last two terms and pleasing to see their efforts being rewarded by on and off field success.

Kieran Coll (G.A.S Tutor)

Here are a few comments from current G.A.S students when asked about the course.

Question: Please complete the following sentence – “The G.A.S Course has… “

“Provided greater opportunities to become a better person and athlete”

“Given me good insight into mental well-being”

“Taught me more about the off -stuff and how to handle different things mentally”

“Provided different ways to engage fellow sportsmen who are wanting to improve themselves (on and off the field), in class and taking their sport game to the next level”